Thursday, December 07, 2006

Just wondering (hoping for some lively discussion)

What is a Jewish Quilt? (You can easily substitute Native American, African American, Japanese, Norwegian, Welsh, etc. for Jewish.)

Is it a quilt made by a Jewish person?

Or is it a Quilt with Judaic prints?

For example, May Britt sent me one of her Norwegian Cat quilt patterns. When I make it will it be a Norwegian quilt?

Or If I were to do one of those whole quilts that the Welsh are known for, would it still be a Welsh quilt?

Conversely, if an Amish lady used Hanukkah prints to make a Quilt, would it be a Jewish quilt?

Or if a Jewish lady make a Christmas quilt as a gift, would it be a Jewish quilt? What is a Jewish lady made a quilt using Kente cloth - would that be Jewish quilt? Would it be an African Quilt?

Any ideas? (I know in the grand scheme of things it doesn't matter - but it something that I have been pondering...)

18 comments:

Ruth said...

Now you are messing with my head. I guess a quilt is defined by the maker adn also by the materials used in it. This used to be simpler to answer before globalisation aided with the distribution of fabrics, and the internet led to cross-pollination of ideas. I'm going to have to ponder this a little.

Jeri said...

great question. When I think of "Welsh Quilt" or "Amish Quilt" I am thinking of the style which is unique to the makers. Such as Amish Quilt = solid colors in patterns they traditionally use - medallion, square in square, bars, etc.

I don't know what would define a "Jewish" quilt or a "Norwegian Cat" quilt - are there designs that are unique to those groups of people? That's how I see it in my mind. I'm interested in the answers you get to this question... wondering if my quilts are "Texas" quilts? "Catholic" quilts? "Caucasian" quilts? or just scrap quilts? :)

McIrish Annie said...

your wheels are really spinning!! I agree with Jeri re: the style of a quilt. now i'm irish so is every quilt I make an Irish quilt?

martha in ny said...

hahaha
I am half irish catholic half presbiterian and my kids father is a jew. So what are their quilts?hhahaha.
I think we have to have a universal category. How about humanist, or felinist? hahaha

Libby said...

Questions to ponder *s*
I would have to say that a quilt would fall into the category of it's style i.e. a Christmas quilt is made for use during Christmas time. I think that's one of those questions you could roll over and over and never come to a firm conclusion.

joyce said...

A quilt is a quilt is a quilt. Lol. But I think Amish denotes a certain style just as scrappy or whole cloth. If there is a definite style to Norwegian quilts then the title would denote that style. I know there is a Welsh style but not sure about a Texas or Catholic style. That's my opinion anyway. It's not the maker that makes it Amish etc. but the style.

Andi said...

I'm going with the majority on this one...certain styles are easily recognized (Amish, whole cloth) and some patterns too - like religious symbols would be a specific denomination.

To me, African quilts evoke images of Africa, and so on. A feminist quilt might have certain fabrics or imagery that bring to mind the struggle for equal rights. Some of it comes from the maker and materials, but soem of it also comes from the viewer and their reaction to any art form.

May Britt said...

Yes you are messing with our heads now LOL. If you sew my catquilt I think it will be a calico cat quilt, not a norwegian quilt. Or perhaps it will be a abyquilt LOL

paula, the quilter said...

Fabric itself can evoke a quilt style. I think that if a quilt were made with all solid fabrics it would evoke an Amish style. Or if African-influenced fabrics etc etc.

If there were something that was uniquely Jewish then I feel that would make it a Jewish quilt.

quiltpixie said...

I figured that the "jewish" "Noregian" Welsh" and other terms refered to a cultural style, and hence the quilt, regardless of its maker or recipient had a style (as in a scrappy style, a wonky style, a victorian style, or jewish, or welsh...) Interesting to ponder though.

Morah said...

I am going to comment on this one....in my blog when I have time. Interesting!

susan said...

I see what you are doing...

Anything to procrastinate on the assignment!

Kay said...

This is too philosophical for me so early in the morning, but I guess I'd go along with the majority that seems to feel it's the theme of the fabric or the style of the work (Amish, for example) that determines, not the maker. Doesn't seem fair, does it?

Clare said...

Surely it is do with the pattern, style, etc, not the maker?

Jules said...

I saw a cool Jewish Quilt at guild. Well, at least I would call it a Jewish Quilt. It was made by different chapters of (and I am sure I have the name wrong, but close) Conservative Jewish Women. Each chapter had a different line from Proverbs to illustrate. And each block had the line in Hebrew and English. So I am pretty sure that was a Jewish Quilt.

Evelyn aka Starfishy said...

I think this day and age of instant access to 1000s of ideas and materials via the internet that distinctions are blending and melding together. Originally, probably there were Amish quilts and Welsh quilts, etc. which were easy to identify simply because that was the pattern and material available in that particular region. I've noticed that a great many Australian quilts start with madalion center and grow out from there compared with most US quilts which seem to repeat a series of blocks or interlocking pattern, but now that I have my hands on some Austrialian quilt magazines - I will try this idea out - a melding of styles due to access of information and ideas!

Cheers!

Evelyn

Shelina said...

I think it has to do more with what the quilt looks like than with the maker. Since there are so many unlabeled quilts, and since years from now, information about even labeled quiltmakers won't necessarily be known. An Amish quilt must be of Amish style, and it is worth more if it is made by someone who is Amish. My Japanese quilt has Japanese writing on it, and has fabric that looks Japanese to my untrained eye, although I am pretty sure none of it was made there. My Christmas quilt has traditional red green and gold colors. (although I did add blue just to be maverick!). I personally don't like to categorize too much, because you have to stereotype to make things fit, but sometimes it does help when trying to describe a quilt!

Mary said...

I agree with the majority here - it's the style that makes it Welsh or Amish not the maker.