Monday, November 06, 2006

Rag Quilting & A Virtual Quilt show

Rag quilting. First I was so suprised by how many have not tried it. (I think everyone around "here" has tried it!)
I sent this to a few people who expressed interest... I hope it make sense. It will save your wrist!

"I have since learned a better way to do the ragging....
It is a bit hard to explain.
When you cut & sew use 1 inch seams.
Now line up your rotary cutting ruler with the seam & cover the seam by about a 1/4 inch.
Now using an old rotary cutter blade, starting at the ruler edge, cut perpendicular to the ruler - creating your ragged edge. (DO NOT CUT TOWARDS THE RULER - YOU CAN JUMP THE RULER & CUT YOURSELF.)
Caveat, I sew in sections not rows. So I would sew all of my row 1 sqaures to my row 2 squares and my row 3 squares to my row 4 squares, etc. And rag all of those seams.
Then I would make 4 patches & rag all of those seams, etc."

This does not get rid of the "unfinshed look" nor does it get rid of the lint that you will get when you first wash it. You really should go to a laundromat to wash and dry it the first time. Those washers and dryers are more heavy duty to handle the mess. (This also works with homespun fabrics and denim - not so much with cotton or batik - although I have seen them done with those fabrics - they don't fray as much as the flannel or homespun.)

Ready for a virtual quilt show? Here is an Australian one from the Canberra Quilters, Inc. be sure to check out both online exhibits. "Annual Exhibition 2006" & "Celebration Quilts 2001" After viewing them, I have to ask, "What is a Brumbie?" & Since we all have favorites, mine from this grouping is the green and orange medalion, "No, Sam" by K. Harrison.

"Gratitude" The hourly quilt project being sponsored by Judy & designed by Jeanne has piqued my interest!

First, I have a ton of 4 patches in blue & yellow & some white (I actually have 25 patches) from a failed scrappy Irish Chain. (I have 25 patches, because I had to get that far before I knew that my "plan" would not work...)

So I got some yellows & I will probably go with the white...

However, (Kinda like a "but" and there is always a "but") I was thinking that I could substitute the 25 patch with a.... Are you ready for this? with a fussy cut cat print.

I don't know, right now I still have the yellows in a pile...

15 comments:

Melzie said...

Let me know how that works out. A fussy cut cat print? You? No way ;) xoxo melzie

Anonymous said...

This is perfect for a fussy cut cat print! In fact, any block with a large square in the center is perfect!

Patti

Nancy said...

Why did I not see that "fussy cut cat print" coming???? LOL!

Mine will be done in blue/yellow. Also because I have a ton of leftover blue/yellow 4-patches/strips from my scrappy spools I started earlier in the year. I haven't finished that project yet but I cut way more strips and sewed them into strip sets than I needed. Like twice too many! So it will be perfect to use for the Gratitudes quilt.

joyce said...

A Brumbie is a wild horse. I think the colors you have would be great and I love the idea of the cat print. Can't wait to see it.

Hedgehog said...

See that Joyce answered the Brunbie questions - learned that one from McLeod's Daughters! I think you could do lots of cool things in the middle of their pattern. Blue and yellow are so nice together. Have fun with it and thanks for the links.

May Britt said...

I think a cat print will do very good. I am not shocked about it that you choose a catprint LOL
Using that you will catch up with us real soon.

Libby said...

Your rag quilt method sounds like it would cause much less fatigue from not having to cut with scissors *hmmmm*

bettsy said...

A brumby is a wild horse. In relation to the quilt item it is my guess that it has something to do with the Canberra rugby union team which is called the Brumbies.
I haven;'t tried a ragquilt as I don't have any flannels and don't want to start a new fabric collection lol But I do love the feel.

Mary said...

I read your instructions on how to cut the rag quilt seams with a rotary cutter but I kind of like the idea of sitting with the quilt in my lap and snipping seams. I was at Michael's today and saw some Fiskars scissors made just for snipping rag quilts and bought a pair. I'm still holding off starting a new quilt for now - I've got so much other stuff to do before the move.

Tracey @ozcountryquiltingmum said...

You are an 80's movie fan, see if you can track down, "the Man from Snowy River." Yes, it was made in the 80's but perfectly fits your period piece genre. It is based on a classic 1890's poem and full of Brumbies and beautiful Australian Alpine scenery.- a good love story thrown in for good measure! Pleased you are doing gratitudes, sounds good to me.

Scrapmaker said...

Thank you for the virtual quilt show! A wonderful blend of traditional and art quilts, every one a beauty.
Have fun with your projects! Jen

Tracey @ozcountryquiltingmum said...

Me again, being a computer idiot I keep trying to put stuff like the neocounter, or any counter in my sidebar and it doesn't work properly, I can get the sitemeters but where exactly do I put them in the template. Please help a fellow catlover, I'll even post Yoda and General Grievous for you as a reward!! (Oh, they're cats...)

Darlene - Dazed Quilter said...

Hey Amy, Count me as someone who has never made a rag quilt! LOL
And, it's not on my "to do" list, either! :-)

Barb said...

I made a rag quilt and I bought a special scissor just for the cutting. I can't fathom using a rotary cutter for that, but then I try to use those as infrequently as possible. I tear fabric whenever possible. I loathe the rotary cutter! My only problem with the rag quilt was that I 'x'd each square, and the x's didn't line up. It bothered me so much I never gave it as the gift it was intended to be. It's balled up in a bag somewhere. Sigh.

Shelina said...

This is a good idea for a rag quilt. I bought spring loaded scissors and snipped away a little bit at a time while watching tv. I think the trick is to not be in a hurry, and be able to start and stop when you want.